A Mother For All

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When I was a wee lass, my grandma came to stay with our family for what seemed to me to be an extended period of time. It may have been in reality only a week or two, but to my fuzzy childhood memory, it was longer than usual. And yet, it felt excruciatingly too short.

When she stayed with us, it meant there was a smiling, warm face to greet me after an arduous half-day of kindergarten. My loving parents were hard-working Catholic school teachers trying to carve out a meager living, so they dealt with childcare by entrusting us kids with the heavy responsibility. My brothers were tasked with unlocking the door and not burning down the house until my parents returned a couple hours later. But as the youngest, they wisely thought it best I should spend my after-school time with adult supervision. It was arranged for me to stay with a neighbor mom who had a daughter my age. While we lived only two doors down from each other and attended the same school, our families were very different. My “little” playmate was at least twice my size and a physical and emotional brute. Today she’d probably be characterized by that popular buzzword, “bully,” but I didn’t have the vocabulary to articulate it back then. To add insult to injury, this mean girl’s mom was pretty mentally checked out and had a knack for turning a blind eye to her daughter’s mean-spirited mischief. She even mocked me when I complained. So I learned to quietly suffer through those seemingly interminable four hours, day after day.

But when my beloved Italian Grandma Pippa came to stay—well, you can imagine my extreme joy. She was the antidote to all that ailed me. Affectionate, loving, doting, she showered me with unconditional attention and kindness. I reveled in all the sensations that accompanied her presence. When I close my eyes I can smell the fresh bread baking that welcomed me as I crossed the threshold. I recall expectantly watching as she dollopped generous pads of butter on the top of the loaf and how it oozed into the crust… and the taste of that melt-in-the-mouth goodness that seemed to permeate my whole being on the dreariest of Cleveland days. Life was so good with my grandma around. She could practically do no wrong to my adoring eyes.

But there was a rare misstep that I considered at the time to be almost unforgivable.

My little neighborhood “frenemy” came over to play with me one day while my grandmother was babysitting. Strangely, I didn’t mind allowing her into my safe haven. In fact, I was more than happy for the chance to show off the amazing woman I was related to. My grandma was the picture of sweet, maternal love and actually lit up when she was around small children. She listened with delight to all our silly stories with a magical twinkle in her eye. It was as if she were committing it all to memory so as to later dazzle the whole adult world with our incredible cuteness. And best of all, this lady belonged to me!

I can think of no reason I would ever pass on the chance to gloat to my 5-year-old oppressor. I wanted her to envy my wonderful grandma. I wanted her to recognize the deficiencies in her own family. I wanted her to know and feel that my family was superior to her wretched home life.

What I didn’t anticipate was that this boundlessly gracious grandma had more than enough love for the both of us. I was absolutely fine with my playmate being the recipient of delicious baked goods and gentle supervision, but I didn’t count on her being on the receiving end of an equal amount of affection and care. That was unthinkable. So, when Grandma Pippa invited my mini-nemesis to call her grandma too, she had crossed a line. I was livid and distraught. The injustice of it all…

“But you’re not her grandma!” I insisted. “You’re my grandma,” to which she chuckled and marveled at my pouty possessiveness. I was not about to share my greatest gift with someone so obviously undeserving. All that goodness I intended to hoard.

In the shadow of two important Marian feasts this Advent season, my reminiscing has taken on new meaning. The liturgical calendar recently marked the Immaculate Conception and Our Lady’s appearance at Guadalupe within the span of a few days. Needless to say, Mary has been on my mind, not accidental on the part of the Church, I’m sure.

I’ve been pondering how amazing it is that Christ willingly shared His perfect mother with us. Yet I have been so consistently wretchedly, sinfully, undeserving. We can all probably see a little of ourselves in my childish self, the little girl who wants to guard and protect all that is good by not sharing with anyone. But in complete contrast to our human inclination to covet and hoard all that is good, Christ recklessly opens His arms and presents his own saintly, immaculate mother to us that we might enjoy her limitless love as He does. Though we don’t merit it, we get to share in that amazing gift. He models for us how to give until it literally hurts. Advent is a time of such hope!

Over the years, I lost touch with that neighborhood girl who was the source of so much strife in my youth. I’d like to think I’ve completely forgiven her. I wonder if she even remembers my now deceased grandma. I’m hopeful that despite my efforts to withhold my sweet grandma’s affection from her, that in the end love overcame my obstruction and that it actually touched and changed her. My experience on this earth informs me that people don’t interface with that kind of maternal love without experiencing some transformation, assuming their hearts are open to it.  And what of a heavenly mother’s perfect love? My goal for the rest of Advent is to have a receptive heart, to receive Mary’s intense healing love through the power of her son. But more importantly, that I might have the grace to share and to give that love freely, especially when it hurts. Blessed Mother, pray for us!

Popping the Catholic Bubble

I am not a hugger. But I have a dear friend who is. She will “love-on” the most unsuspecting stranger with abandon. Often when I’ve introduced her to others I lead with, “Be prepared… she’s a hugger.” Then I stand back as she envelops them in a firestorm of affection. If the recipient of the hug is not particularly into it, they often glare at me over her shoulder, followed by a resigned eye-roll from within the folds of her exuberantly tight embrace. I just watch, both cringing and marveling at her expressive boldness.

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How to explain the hugger vs. the non-hugger? Well, my emotionally demonstrative friend has a much smaller personal space bubble than I. You’ve heard how different cultures have varying ideas of acceptable physical contact upon introductions. If you have a Mediterranean bubble, you’re more hands-on and more likely to touch, hug or even kiss someone you’ve just met. Picture the Italians’ cheek-to-cheek smooch, which is a standard greeting among new acquaintances. A person of German or British descent, however, might be more likely to give you a good bit of space and disdain any seemingly gratuitous touching with a person who is not a relative or friend. And a joyful, extroverted lady who hails from the heart of Iowa?—well, expect a big old midwestern uninhibited hug. (For the record, I do hug, but the aforementioned  requirements of relative or friend  must be met before I feel—to borrow from the cool kids’ vernacular— “getting all up into someone’s grille.”)

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Signs You Suffer M.V.D.S on Your Faith Journey

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I drive a minivan. Don’t be jealous. It’s been seven glorious years since my husband and I decided to take the plunge and purchase our little Honda house on wheels. To my mind, we made the right decision. From the ease of the automatic sliding doors when hands are juggling groceries, diaper bag, and baby carrier, to the times we’ve happily hauled gaggles of kids on field trips, it’s been a helpful tool in achieving our family’s version of domestic contentment. However, there have been definite downsides that demand address. “What is that smell?!” Don’t get me started on the joys of finding hidden-away “treasures” in the very back row. Suffice it to say, the heralded discovery of a new antibiotic may be in our future. But a much more pressing and troubling concern regularly plagues me. Everyone else on the road who is not a minivan driver is suffering from a severe case of M.V.D.S.

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Beware! Are you a ZOMBIE Catholic?

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(This was posted last October and got a lot of great feedback, so I’m reposting for those of you who would like a refresher on Zombie Catholicism. I added a particular prayer at the end of the post that has helped me personally keep the zombies at bay)

Halloween is just around the corner. And as usual, I expect to see my fair share of kids trick-r-treating in their zombie get-ups: pasty white masks with dark, vacant circles for eyes, torn shirts and pants, occasionally a little flourish of fake blood splattered here or there. It’s usually the teenagers who go all out with the most gruesome costumes, but occasionally a five-year-old will greet me at the doorstep decked out in full zombie face paint and garb. I respond the same way each time. “Oh… wow…quite a costume,” I stutter with my best perma-smile. “My, look at all that blood… here’s your candy,” I murmur, avoiding eye contact while timidly dropping a couple snickers in the outstretched bag. Then I anxiously scan the perimeter to make sure there aren’t any zombie parents lurking nearby.

Don’t chuckle. Zombies exist. They dwell in our midst.

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A Case for Daily Mass in Catholic Schools

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My kids are officially back in the swing of school. I know what you’re thinking: WooHoo! Carline drop-off must be the most absolutely magical part of the day! I must admit, watching my kids exit through the automatic sliding minivan doors with the exchange of a kiss, is pretty awesome. (What stay-at-home mom doesn’t crave a few hours of solitude to accomplish the endless household chores before they all frantically pile back in taking their seats in the constant carousel ride of family chaos?) But, believe it or not, the drop-off is not my absolute favorite part of the day. There’s another much more special moment that wins by a long shot!

It comes shortly after morning carline, and quite frankly, its significance kind of snuck up on me. Over time I’ve come to cherish it as the treasured gift from God that I know it to be.

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Filth & Faith Part 2: Weathering the Storm in the Church

A couple of weeks ago, a huge fall thunderstorm erupted in the middle of the otherwise quiet night.  It startled me from a dead sleep. I tried my absolute best to disregard the racket and the flashing light in order to remain blissfully slumbering.

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I was in that foggy quasi-sleep state in the midst of trying to self-soothe back to a deep unconsciousness, when one of my sons snuck into our room and boldly announced, “What is going on out there?!” If you’ve ever had a kiddo swoop in while you’re trying to rest, you’ll understand when I say my hair was now standing on end. Children are like nighttime ninja. You never hear their stealthy approach but are made frighteningly aware when they are hovering mere inches from your face. It’s straight out of a horror film.

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Filth & Faith: How My Husband and I are Talking to Our Kids About the Problems in Our Church

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Is it just me or have you noticed how every single reading from Mass over the last couple weeks seems to point to all of the unrest and scandal in the church of late? Not in that oblique, beating around the bush kind of way, but overtly, and in a way that seems to strike you to the core. It’s kind of how I remember feeling after a romantic heartbreak. No matter what station I tuned the radio dial to, I’d hear a song that eerily seemed to be speaking directly to me. But this a lot different. It’s not the voice of Tears for Fears. It’s God who is knocking on our collective foreheads, trying to break through so we might truly hear Him in the midst of such devastation.

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